Note: Please refer to the Town of Ingersoll Carbon Monoxide Bylaw #4661-11 for additional information on CO detector placements

CO Alarms Now Mandatory in All Homes

Ontario is taking another step to keep families and homes in Ontario safe by making carbon monoxide alarms mandatory in all residential homes.

 

The new regulation, which comes into effect October 15, updates Ontario's Fire Code following the passage of Bill 77 last year. These updates are based on recommendations from a Technical Advisory Committee which was led by the Office of the Fire Marshall and Emergency Management and included experts from fire services, the hotel and rental housing industries, condo owners and alarm manufacturers.

 

Carbon monoxide detectors will now be required near all sleeping areas in residential homes and in the service rooms, and adjacent sleeping areas in multi-residential units. Carbon monoxide alarms can be hardwired, battery-operated or plugged into the wall.

 

Quick Facts

 

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide is a colourless, odorless, tasteless, toxic gas that has the molecular formula CO. The molecule consists of a carbon atom that is triple bonded to an oxygen atom.

 

Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of the fossil fuels - gas, oil, coal and wood used in boilers, engines, oil burners, gas fires, water heaters, solid fuel appliances and open fires.

 

Carbon Monoxide is a commercially important chemical. It is also formed in many chemical reactions and in the thermal or incomplete decomposition of many organic materials.

 

Dangerous amounts of CO can accumulate when, as a result of poor installation, poor maintenance or failure or damage to an appliance in service, the fuel is not burned properly, or when rooms are poorly ventilated and the Carbon Monoxide is unable to escape.

 

Having no smell, taste or colour, in today's world of improved insulation and double glazing, it has become increasingly important to have good ventilation, maintain all appliances regularly and to have absolutely reliable Detector alarms installed giving both a visual and audible warning immediately there is a build-up of CO to dangerous levels.

Carbon Monoxide Detector Placement

PLACEMENT OF CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS IS IMPORTANT

 

CO detectorProper placement of a carbon monoxide detector is important. If you are installing only one carbon monoxide detector, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends it be located near the sleeping area, where it can wake you if you are asleep. Additional detectors on every level and in every bedroom of a home provides extra protection.

 

Homeowners should remember not to install carbon monoxide detectors directly above or beside fuel-burning appliances, as appliances may emit a small amount of carbon monoxide upon start-up. A detector should not be placed within fifteen feet of heating or cooking appliances or in or near very humid areas such as bathrooms.

 

When considering where to place a carbon monoxide detector, keep in mind that although carbon monoxide is roughly the same weight as air (carbon monoxide's specific gravity is 0.9657, as stated by the EPA; the National Resource Council lists the specific gravity of air as one), it may be contained in warm air coming from combustion appliances such as home heating equipment. If this is the case, carbon monoxide will rise with the warmer air.

 

Note: Please refer to the Town of Ingersoll Carbon Monoxide Bylaw #4661-11 for additional information on CO detector placements.

 

Safety precautions: For RV's Motor Homes and Caravans


Here are 13 recommendations to reduce the risk of CO poisoning:

 

  1. RVThe most important recommendation: USE A CARBON MONOXIDE WARNING DETECTOR. As is true of a smoke alarm, reliance on a CO detector is acceptable only if the device is in good working order and is tested periodically as directed by the manufacturer.

  2. Inspect your RV's chassis and generator exhaust system regularly, at least before each outing and after bottoming out or any other incident that could cause damage.

  3. Inspect the RV for openings in the floor or sidewalls. If you locate a hole, seal it with a silicone adhesive or have it repaired before using your generator again.
  4. Inspect windows, door seals, and weather strips to ensure that they are sealing properly.

  5. Yellow flames in propane-burning appliances such as coach heaters, stoves, ovens, and water heaters usually indicate a lack of oxygen. Determine the cause of this condition and correct it immediately.

  6. If applicable, have your built-in vacuum cleaner checked to make sure it does not exhaust under the underside of your RV. Have the system changed if it does.

  7. Do not operate your generator if the exhaust system is damaged in any way or if an unusual noise is present.

  8. Park your RV so that the exhaust may easily dissipate away from the vehicle. Do not park next to high grass or weeds, snowbanks, buildings, or other obstructions that might prevent exhaust gases from dissipating as they should.

  9. Keep in mind that shifting winds may cause exhaust to blow away from the coach one moment and under the coach the next.

  10. When stopping for long periods of time, be aware of other vehicles around you, such as tractor-trailers at rest stops, that may have their engines and refrigerators running.

  11. Do not sleep with the generator operating.

  12. Leave a roof vent open anytime the generator is running, even during the winter.

  13. If you do not feel well, do not be fooled into thinking that it isbecause you have been driving too long, you ate too much, or you are suffering from motion sickness. Shut off the generator and step outside for some fresh air just to be sure.